In a recent Connecticut Post article, 2011 Carl Wilkens Fellow Cynthia Davis explained her perspective on the powerful impact that she can have by empowering women affected by genocide. “I have come to realize what one person can do, which is why this has been so life-changing for me,” she said. “I can make a […]

In a recent Connecticut Post article, 2011 Carl Wilkens Fellow Cynthia Davis explained her perspective on the powerful impact that she can have by empowering women affected by genocide. “I have come to realize what one person can do, which is why this has been so life-changing for me,” she said. “I can make a difference in so many lives, so far away.”

Cynthia Davis works on a canvas in her home studio as part of her Sudan Canvas Project. Photo: Brian A. Pounds | Connecticut Post

Her belief that one person can change the lives of many others guided Davis to found the Sudan Canvas Project, which uses art as a way to raise awareness of the humanitarian crisis in Sudan while generating funds to provide trade education to women in South Sudan. In one of the project’s current initiatives, artists from across Connecticut are creating works inspired by the lives of Sudanese women and Sudan in general. The art is due October 15th and will be featured in an exhibition and then auctioned off at the Fairfield Arts Center on November 15th; the proceeds from the event will go towards the project.

Davis’ commitment to improving the lives of Sudanese women led to her selection as a member of the Carl Wilkens Fellowship class of 2011. The Carl Wilkens Fellowship is designed to provide individuals with the opportunity to meaningfully contribute to the fight to end genocide. It is named in honor of Carl Wilkens, the only American who chose to remain in Rwanda during the 1994 genocide and is credited with saving hundreds of lives. Davis’ spirit of service is in harmony with the theme of the program: ordinary individuals can make an extraordinary difference when they choose to engage.

  • Smith, John

    This is a great move to prevent criminal to enjoy movement without arrest. we should also campaign the UK government to sanction Sudan participation in the London Olympic 2012. this will signaled to the Sudanese public that, Bashir need to be removed and account for his crimes against humanity and stop to his current atrocities in Southern Kordufan and Blue Nile.

    Victory in bring the criminal to the book is certain!

  • DWCS

    One African nation protested, many will soon follow!

  • Elaine

    This is good news that Malawi has taken this stance and pressure from the US may have contributed, but the US will continue to be (rightly) accused of hypocrisy as long as the US pushes for Bashir to be arrested while refusing to be a party to the International Criminal Court which issued his arrest warrant.

  • mohamed mahgoub

    This average move from mallawi to bring this criminal to justice and make him and his acomplices to realise that world is going afterthem no matter how time it will take

  • http://yahoo abass sulieman

    let former all allow to joined prevent genocide from sudan refused criminal Omarr to attend

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